Graduate Courses for Electrical & Computer Engineering (ENEE)

Schedule of Classes: Fall | Winter | Spring | Summer
(Only current and next semester available)

ENEE 407 Microwave-Circuits Laboratory (2 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE205; or minimum grade of C- in ENEE206. And ENEE381; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical).
Experiments concerned with circuits constructed from microwave components providing practical experience in the design, construction and testing of such circuits. Projects include microwave filters and S-parameter design with applications of current technology.

ENEE 408 Capstone Design Project (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
Culmination of prior course work in electrical and computer engineering. Utilization of modern design tools and methodologies for the design of components or systems under realistic constraints, with particular emphasis on teamwork and oral/written communication. Areas in which projects are currently offered include: microprocessor-based systems, digital systems, VLSI design (both digital and mixed-signal), and optical systems.

ENEE 411 Advanced Analog and Digital Electronics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE303. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer) ; and must have permission of the department. Credit only granted for: ENEE411 or ENEE419A. Formerly: ENEE419A.
Examination of analog and digital device models for analysis, design, and simulation of transistor level electronic circuits, emphasizing Metal Oxide Silicon Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs); fundamental single transistor configurations; frequency response, feedback, and stability of multi-transistor circuits, such as current mirrors, differential amplifiers, voltage references, operational amplifiers and data converters; complementary Metal Oxide Silicon (CMOS) implementations of static and clocked digital as well as mixed signal circuits.

ENEE 416 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE303; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Formerly: ENEE419J.
Characterization of wafers and fabrication steps. Oxide growth, lithography, dopant diffusion, and metal deposition and patterning will be discussed in the lectures and carried out in the lab in fabricating NMOS transistor circuits. The transistor characteristics will be measured and related to the fabrication parameters.

ENEE 417 Microelectronics Design Laboratory (2 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE307; and minimum grade of C- in ENEE313; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer).
Students design and build fairly sophisticated circuits, mainly composed of discrete transistors and integrated circuits. Many of the projects are designed to require that students synthesize from what they have learned in many of the disciplines in electrical engineering. Students learn they can actually use their knowledge to build something very practical, which may include a high-fidelity amplifier, a radio, a memory cell, a transmitter, etc.

ENEE 419 Topics in Microelectronics (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer). Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs.
Selected topics of current importance in microelectronics.

ENEE 420 Communication Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE324; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum.
Fourier series, Fourier transforms and linear system analysis; random signals, autocorrelation functions and power spectral densities; analog communication systems: amplitude modulation, single-sideband modulation, frequency and phase modulation, sampling theorem and pulse-amplitude modulation; digital communication systems pulse-code modulation, phase-shift keying, differential phase shift keying, frequency shift keying; performance of analog and digital communication systems in the presence of noise.

ENEE 425 Digital Signal Processing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE322; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum.
Sampling as a modulation process; aliasing; the sampling theorem; the Z-transform and discrete-time system analysis; direct and computer-aided design of recursive and nonrecursive digital filters; the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT); digital filtering using the FFT; analog-to-digital and digital-to analog conversion; effects of quantization and finite-word-length arithmetic.

ENEE 426 Communication Networks (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE324; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in Engineering: Electrical program.
The main design issues associated with computer networks, satellite systems, radio nets, and general communication networks. Application of analytical tools of queuing theory to design problems in such networks. Review of proposed architectures and protocols.

ENEE 428 Communications Design Laboratory (2 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE324; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Corequisite: ENEE425 or ENEE420. Restriction: Must be in Engineering: Electrical program.
EE capstone design course. Exploring the signal processing and communication systems theoretical concepts presented in ENEE 420 Communication Systems and ENEE 425 Digital Signal Processing by implementing them on actual DSP based hardware in real time.

ENEE 429 Topics in Communications (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer). Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs.
Selected topics of current importance in communications.

ENEE 434 Introduction to Neural Networks and Signals (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE205; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer).
Introduction to the generation and processing of bioelectric signals including structure and function of the neuron, membrane theory, generation and propagation of nerve impulses, synaptic mechanisms, transduction and neural coding of sensory events, central nervous system processing of sensory information and correlated electrical signals, control of effector organs, muscle contraction and mechanics, and models of neurons and neural networks.

ENEE 435 Introduction to Electrical Processes, Structure and Computing Models of the Brain (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE205; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer).
Concepts, theoretical and experimental probing methods and models for understanding the human brain structures and functions from an engineering viewpoint. Bioelectric phenomena of cells and electrical circuit functional models. Neurons as signal generators, decision elements, and information transmission and processing devices. Basic neural circuits and models. Experimental techniques, signal recording and analysis. Brain architecture-communication, control and information processing structures and functions. Memory, associations learning and higher brain functions. Computer simulations and computational models. Overview of brain-inspired intelligent machine approaches and systems.

ENEE 439 Topics in Signal Processing (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs.
Selected topics of current importance in signal processing.

ENEE 440 Microprocessors (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE350; and completion of all lower division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical).
Microprocessor architectures, instruction sets, and applications. Bus structures, memory, I/O interfacing. Assembly language programming, LSI device configuration, and the embedding of microprocessors in systems.

ENEE 445 Computer Laboratory (2 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE205; or minimum grade of C- in ENEE206. And minimum grade of C- in ENEE350; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical).
This laboratory course focuses on the hardware/software interface in computer systems. Hand-on experiments are used to teach design, construction, analysis, and measurement of both hardware and software for embedded systems. Projects emphasize using microcontrollers for control, sensing, and communication through various I/O devices.

ENEE 446 Digital Computer Design (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE350; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum.
Hardware design of digital computers. Arithmetic and logic units, adders, multipliers and dividers. Floating-point arithmetic units. Bus and register structures. Control units, both hardwired and microprogrammed. Index registers, stacks, and other addressing schemes. Interrupts, DMA and interfacing.

ENEE 447 Operating Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE350; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum; and must be familiar with UNIX; and must have experience in C or C++. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer). Formerly: ENEE459S.
The goal of this course is to present the theory, design, implementation and analysis of computer operating systems. Through classroom lectures, homework, and projects, students learn the fundamentals of concurrency, and process management, interprocess communication and synchronization, job scheduling algorithms, memory management, input/output devices, file systems, and protection and security in operating systems. Optional topics may include communications protocols, computer security, and real-time operating systems.

ENEE 459 Topics in Computer Engineering (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs.
Selected topics of current importance in computer engineering.

ENEE 460 Control Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE322; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in Engineering: Electrical program.
Mathematical models for control system components. Transform and time domain methods for linear control systems. Introductory stability theory. Root locus, bode diagrams and Nyquist plots. Design specifications in the time and frequency domains. Compensation design in the time and frequency domain. Introduction to sampled data systems.

ENEE 461 Control Systems Laboratory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE205; or minimum grade of C- in ENEE206. And minimum grade of C- in ENEE322; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Credit only granted for: ENEE461, ENME461, or ENME489N.
Students will design, implement, and test controllers for a variety of systems. This will enhance their understanding of feedback control and familiarize them with the characteristics and limitations of real control devices. They will also complete a small project. This will entail writing a proposal, purchasing parts for their controller, building the system, testing it, and writing a final report describing what they have done.

ENEE 463 Digital Control Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE322; and completion of lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer). Formerly: ENEE469E.
Introduction to techniques for the analysis and design of linear control systems and implementation of control systems using digital technology. Topics include linearization, solution of linear equations, z-transforms and Laplace transforms, design of linear controllers, optimal control, and digital implementation of control designs. Students will use MATLAB for the solution of problems and the design of control systems.

ENEE 469 Topics in Controls (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs.
Selected topics of current importance in controls.

ENEE 473 Electrical Machines Laboratory (2 credits)
Prerequisite: 1 course with a minimum grade of C- from (ENEE205, ENEE206); and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer).
Experiments involving single and three phase transformers, induction machines, synchronous machines and D.C. machines.

ENEE 474 Power Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE322; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum.
Interconnected power systems, transmission lines, load flow studies, unit commitment and economic dispatch. Three phase networks, machine models. Symmetrical components, fault analysis and unbalanced operation. Power system transients, stability and numerical methods in power system analysis.

ENEE 475 Power Electronics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE303; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Electrical; Engineering: Computer).
This course is suitable for undergraduate and graduate students who want to learn the basic principles of power electronics and its applications. Special emphasis is placed on interdisciplinary nature of power electronics. Strong and intimate connections between power electronics and circuit theory, electronic circuits, semiconductor devices, electric power, magnetic, motor drives and control are stressed.

ENEE 480 Fundamentals of Solid State Electronics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE303; and Must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical).
Crystal structure and materials preparation; carrier transport; elementary quantum mechanics applied to solids; band structure of metals, insulators, and semiconductors; field effect transistors; PN junctions; bipolar transistors; fabrication of devices.

ENEE 482 Design of Active and Passive Microwave Devices (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE381; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum.
Design and operation of passive and active microwave devices. The passive components include waveguides, resonators, and antennas. The active devices include klystrons, magnetrons, gyrotrons, and free electron lasers.

ENEE 486 Optoelectronics Lab (2 credits)
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in ENEE205; or minimum grade of C- in ENEE206. And minimum grade of C- in PHYS271 and PHYS270; and must have earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all required 200-level ENEE courses; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical).
Hands-on experience in performing measurements in optics and electro-optics. Basics of optics, light detectors, Fourier optics, gratings and spectrometers, pulsed dye lasers, fiber optics, electro-optics, and acousto-optics.

ENEE 488 Independent Study in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Must have completed and earned a minimum grade of regular (letter) C- in all lower-division EE or CP tech electives; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Additional information: A total of 5 credits combined of ENEE488 and ENEE499 can count towards a degree in electrical and computer engineering.
The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity for independent study projects on advanced electrical and computer engineering topics. These projects typically involve academic investigations of technical themes that are not addressed in the established elective and special topics courses taught by the department on a regular basis. Study plans are tailored to students educational goals but are approved and supervised by faculty.

ENEE 489 Topics in Electrophysics (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs.
Selected topics of current importance in electrophysics.

ENEE 490 Physical Principles of Wireless Communications (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE381. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical). Credit only granted for: ENEE490 or ENEE498B. Formerly: ENEE498B.

ENEE 496 Lasers and Electro-optic Devices (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE381; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in one of the following programs (Engineering: Computer; Engineering: Electrical).
Modern physical optics: Gaussian beams, optical resonators, optical waveguides; theory of laser oscillation, rate equations; common laser systems. Selected modern optoelectronic devices like detectors and modulators. Role of lasers and optoelectronics in modern technology.

ENEE 498 Topics in Electrical Engineering (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in Engineering: Electrical program. Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE488.
Selected topics of current importance in electrical engineering.

ENEE 499 Senior Projects in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1-5 credits)
Prerequisite: Permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department; and completion of all lower-division technical courses in the EE curriculum. Restriction: Must be in Engineering: Electrical program. Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE418. Additional information: A total of 5 credits combined of ENEE448 and ENEE499 can count toward a degree in electrical or computer engineering.
The purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to engage in independent research projects on advanced electrical and computer engineering topics. Projects are selected by students and supervised by faculty and other qualified mentors. While students may be required to acquire new skills or information in the course of completing a 499 project, the focus is to conduct an independent investigation of a technical theme by the student. The project may be used to satisfy the advanced lab requirement if it is approved as a primarily - experimental research project. In that case, the student will enroll in ENEE499L.

ENEE 600 Solid State Electronics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE413; and must have background in elementary quantum mechanics. Credit only granted for: ENEE600 or ENEE793. Formerly: ENEE793.
Properties of crystals; energy bands: electron transport theory; conductivity and hall effect; statistical distributions; fermi level: impurities; non-equilibrium carrier distributions; normal modes of lattice vibration and thermal properties of crystals; tunneling phenomena; surface properties.

ENEE 601 Semiconductor Devices and Technology (3 credits)
Recommended: ENEE413 and ENEE600. Credit only granted for: ENEE601 or ENEE697. Formerly: ENEE697.
The principles, structures and characteristics of semiconductor devices. Technology and fabrication of semiconductor devices.

ENEE 605 Design and Fabrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) (3 credits)
Credit only granted for: ENEE605 or ENEE719R. Formerly: ENEE719R.
The goals are to explore the world of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) by understanding its design and fabrication aspects.

ENEE 610 Electrical Network Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Must have completed undergraduate-level Circuit Theory; or permission of instructor.
Matrix algebra, network elements, ports, passivity and activity, geometrical and analytical descriptions of networks, state variable characterizations, scattering matrices, signal flow graphs, sensitivity.

ENEE 611 Integrated Circuit Design and Analysis (3 credits)
Recommended: ENEE610. Credit only granted for: ENEE611 or ENEE696. Formerly: ENEE696.
Active and passive elements used in semiconductor structures. Design application of linear and digital integrated circuits.

ENEE 614 Radio Frequency VLSI Circuit Design (3 credits)
Recommended: ENEE611.
This course will give students the knowledge required to analyze, design and lay-out discrete and integrated circuits used in modern radio frequency communications. The course will focus on advanced amplifier concepts, frequency conversion, tuning, and low-noise techniques. Implementation of AM, FM and digital modulation techniques will be covered. Emphasis will be given to CMOS technology as applied to analog VLSI. Advanced applications of SPICE and VLSI design layout tools will be covered.

ENEE 620 Random Processes in Communication and Control (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE324; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Introduction to random processes: characterization, classification, representation; Gaussian and other examples. Linear operations on random processes, stationary processes: covariance function and spectral density. Linear least square waveform estimating Wiener-Kolmogroff filtering, Kalman-Bucy recursive filtering: function space characterization, non-linear operations on random processes.

ENEE 621 Estimation and Detection Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Estimation of unknown parameters, Cramer-Rao lower bound; optimum (map) demodulation; filtering, amplitude and angle modulation, comparison with conventional systems; statistical decision theory Bayes, minimax, Neyman/Pearson, Criteria-68 simple and composite hypotheses; application to coherent and incoherent signal detection; M-ary hypotheses; application to uncoded and coded digital communication systems.

ENEE 623 Digital Communications (3 credits)
Recommended: ENEE420.
Review of sampling and quantization, functional characterization of digital signals and transmission facilities, band-limited signals and systems. Digital modulation/demodulation techniques, error probability, intersymbol interference and its effects, adaptive equalization. Signaling with coded waveforms, fading and satellite channels, multiple access problems and protocols. Introduction to spread-spectrum Communications.

ENEE 625 Multi-user Communication (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620.
Basic queueing models. Store-and forward communications networks; switching modes; delay-throughput measures; capacity assignment; routing; topological design; computational aspects; flow control; error control; protocols; specification and validation; local networks; satellite and packet radio systems; multiple access schemes; stability and performance; multi-user information theory; and large scale system theory.

ENEE 626 Error Correcting Codes (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE420; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. Credit only granted for: ENEE626 or ENEE722. Formerly: ENEE722.
Introduction to linear codes; bounds on the error correction capabilities of codes; convolutional codes with threshold, sequential and viterbi decoding; cyclic random error correcting codes; P-N sequences; cyclic and convolutional burst error correcting codes.

ENEE 627 Information Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620. Credit only granted for: ENEE627 or ENEE721. Formerly: ENEE721.
Information measures and their properties; entropy, relative entropy and mutual information. Information source models. Lossless data compression: the Kraft inequality, Shannon-Fano and Huffman codes. Typical sequences, asymptotic equipartition property, lossy source coding. Discrete memoryless channels: capacity, channel coding theorem. The additive Gaussian channel. Source coding under a fidelity constraint: rate distortion function and rate distortion theorem.

ENEE 630 Advanced Digital Signal Processing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE425. Corequisite: ENEE620. Credit only granted for: ENEE624 or ENEE630. Formerly: ENEE624.
This is the first-year graduate course in signal processing. The objective is to establish fundamental concepts of signal processing on multirate processing, parametric modeling, linear prediction theory, modern spectral estimation, and high-resolution techniques.

ENEE 631 Digital Image and Video Processing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620 and ENEE630; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Foundations of digital image and video processing. Topics covered: 2-D systems and transforms; image acquisition and perception; multi-dimensional sampling; quantization; linear and non-linear techniques for image enhancement and restoration; basics on image analysis; lossless and lossy image compression; motion estimation and compensation; still image and video coding standards; applications of image and video processing.

ENEE 632 Speech and Audio Processing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620 and ENEE630. Credit only granted for: ENEE739A or ENEE632. Formerly: ENEE739A.
The objective is to apply digital signal processing techniques to speech and music signals. Topics covered include acoustic theory of speech production leading to the source-filter model; acoustic and digital vocal-tract models of speech production; speech analysis-synthesis based on the short-time Fourier transform, linear prediction, and homomorphic representations; extensions to other multiresolution analysis; time-domain models for speech processing; auditory perception and speech perception; waveform and model-based speech coding using scalar and vector quantization; time-scale modification; pitch and formant estimation; application of techniques to music analysis-synthesis.

ENEE 633 Statistical Pattern Recognition (3 credits)
Prerequisite: MATH461; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department; or permission of instructor. Corequisite: ENEE620. Credit only granted for: ENEE633 or ENEE739Q. Formerly: ENEE739Q.
The goal is to introduce mathematical pattern analysis and recognition. Emphasis is given to parametric and non-parametric statistical pattern recognition methods and clustering with applications to speech, image and video recognition.

ENEE 634 Space-Time Signal Process (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620 and ENEE630. Credit only granted for: ENEE634 or ENEE724. Formerly: ENEE724.
Space-time processing aspects of signal processing with applications to wireless communications are considered, including fast algorithms, numerical computation, adaptive beamforming, direction of arrivals estimation, array processing, adaptive algorithms (least means square algorithms and recursive least means square algorithms), channel equalization, blind equalization and identification, and space-time coding, modulation, and MIMO communications and signal processing.

ENEE 640 VLSI Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE446 and ENEE488; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department; or permission of instructor.
Review of MOS transistors: fabrication, layout, characterization; CMOS circuit and logic design: circuit and logic simulation, fully complementary CMOS logic, pseudo-nMOS logic, dynamic CMOS logic, pass-transistor logic, clocking strategies; sub system design: ALUs, multipliers, memories, PLAs; architecture design: datapath, floorplanning, iterative cellular arrays, systolic arrays; VLSI algorithms; chip design and test: full custom design of chips, possible chip fabrication by MOSIS and subsequent chip testing.

ENEE 641 Mathematical Foundations for Computer Engineering (3 credits)
Credit only granted for: ENEE641 or ENEE759F. Formerly: ENEE759F.
Mathematical modeling, design, analysis and proof techniques related to computer engineering. Probability, logic, combinatorics, set theory, and graph theory, as they pertain to the design and performance of computer engineering systems. Techniques for the design and analysis of efficient computational methods from graph theory and networks. Understanding of the limits on the efficiency of such computational methods. Translation from mathematical theory to actual programming. The course emphasizes mathematical rigor.

ENEE 644 Computer-Aided Design of Digital Systems (3 credits)
Design methodologies for digital systems using a modern hardware description language. Algorithmic, architectural and implementation aspects of arithmetic processing elements. Design of Complex Instruction Set (CISC), Reduced Instruction Set (RISC), and floating point processors. Synthesis, simulation and testing of processors with computer-aided design tools. Students in some sections may, on permission, fabricate VLSI chips via MOSIS.

ENEE 645 Compilers and Optimization (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE350 or CMSC216; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. Credit only granted for: ENEE645 or ENEE759C. Formerly: ENEE759C.
The compilation, linking and loading process. Using lexical analyzers and parsers. Intermediate forms. Global, stack and heap objects, and their addressing modes. Stack implementation. Control flow analysis and optimization. Dataflow analysis and optimization including Static, single assignment. Alias analysis.

ENEE 646 Digital Computer Design (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE446; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Concepts and techniques for design of computer systems with improved performance. Advanced I/O systems, memory organization, pipeland and parallel processors, bus bandwidth, processor/memory interconnections, cache memory, virtual memory, multiprocessors, performance evaluation.

ENEE 647 Design of Distributed Computer Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE488.
Communication protocols, models of interprocess communication and synchronization in distributed operating systems, interprocess synchronization and communication primitives; remote procedure call protocols; electronic mail and store-and-forward communication; deadlock handling in distributed systems; processes and transactions in distributed systems; client servers models of computation; distributed shared memory; distributed file systems; recovery and fault-tolerance; protection and communication security.

ENEE 648 Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineering (3 credits)
Every semester courses intended for high degree of specialization are offered by visiting or regular electrical engineering faculty members in two or more of the areas listed in 488. The student should check with the electrical engineering office of graduate studies for a list and the description of the topics offered currently.

ENEE 651 Parallel Algorithms (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CMSC451; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. Also offered as: CMSC751. Credit only granted for: ENEE651, ENEE759K or CMSC751. Formerly: ENEE759K.
A presentation of the theory of parallel computers and parallel processing. Models of parallel processing and the relationships between these models. Techniques for the design and analysis of efficient parallel algorithms including parallel prefix, searching, sorting, graph problems, and algebraic problems. Theoretical limits of parallelism.

ENEE 660 System Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE460 and MATH463; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
General systems models. State variables and state space. Linearity and its implications. Controllability and observability. State space structure and representation. Realization theory and algorithmic solutions. Parameterizations of linear systems; canonical forms. Basic results from stability theory. Stabilizability. Fine structure of linear multivariable systems; minimal indices and polynomial matrices. Interplay between frequency domain and state space.

ENEE 661 Nonlinear Control Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE660; and (MATH410 or MATH411; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department). Or permission of instructor.
State space methods of stability analysis including second order systems and the phase plane, linearization and stability in the small, stability in the large and Lyapunov's second method. Frequency domain methods including the describing function. Popov's method and functional analytic methods. Introduction to Volterra series representations of nonlinear systems. Applications to conrol system design.

ENEE 662 Convex Optimization (3 credits)
Recommended: MATH410. Credit only granted for: ENEE759F or ENEE662.
Focuses on recognizing, solving, and analyzing convex optimization problems. Convex sets, convex functions, convex and quasi-convex optimization problems. Duality theory and optimality conditions. Specific classes of problems including linear optimization (LP), semi-definite optimization (SDP), geometric programming. Algorithms for unconstrained and constrained optimization; interior-point methods. Applications in controls, communications, signal processing, statistics, and other areas.

ENEE 664 Optimal Control (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE660 and MATH140; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department; or permission of instructor. Corequisite: MATH411; or permission of instructor.
General optimization and control problems. Conditions of optimality for unconstrained and constrained optimization problems; sensitivity; duality. Introduction to linear and nonlinear programming methods. Dynamic optimization. Discrete time maximum principle and applications. Pontryagin maximum principle in continuous time. Dynamic programming. Feedback realization of optimal control.

ENEE 680 Electromagnetic Theory I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE381; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Theoretical analysis and engineering applications of Maxwell's equations. Boundary value problems of electrostatics and magnetostatics.

ENEE 681 Electromagnetic Theory II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE381; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Continuation of ENEE 680. Theoretical analysis and engineering applications of Maxwell's equations. The homogeneous wave equation. Plane wave propagation. The interaction of plane waves and material media. Retarded potentials. The Hertz potential. Simple radiating systems. Relativisitic covariance of Maxwell's equations.

ENEE 686 Charged Particle Dynamics, Electron and Ion Beams (3 credits)
Restriction: Permission of instructor.
General principles of single-particle dynamics; mapping of the electric and magnetic fields; equation of motion and methods of solution; production and control of charge particle beams; electron optics; Liouville's theorem; space charge effects in high current beams; design principles of special electron and ion beam devices.

ENEE 690 Quantum and Wave Phenomena with Electrical Application (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE381; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Introduction of quantum and wave phenomena from electrical engineering point of view. Topics included: general principles of quantum mechanics, operator algebra, the microwave resonant cavity and the analagous potential well problem, harmonic oscillator, hydrogenic atom. Perturbation method applied to the transmission line and potential well problems. Periodically loaded transmission line and Kronig-Penny model of band theory.

ENEE 691 Optical Communication Systems (3 credits)
Optical components and systems. Measures of performance of optical communication systems. Topics include: single and multi-mode optical fibers, DFB and DBR lasers, transmitters and receivers, pin and APD detectors, noise analysis, receiver sensitivity modulation formats, system performance, bit-error-rate, power budget, TDM and WDM systems, network architecture.

ENEE 698 Graduate Seminar (1-3 credits)
Restriction: Permission of instructor.
Every semester regular seminars are held in electrical science and in the six areas of specialization offered by the electrical engineering department. They may be taken, by arrangement with the student's advisor, for repeated credit.

ENEE 699 Independent Studies in Electrical Engineering (1-3 credits)
Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE609.
Supervised individual study or project, or supervised group study or project, at an advanced level, in electrical engineering.

ENEE 702 Advanced Electronic Materials and Devices (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE413; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. Credit only granted for: ENEE702 or ENEE714. Formerly: ENEE714.
The operating principles, fabrication, charateristics and applications of advanced electronic devices will be covered. The devices are the subject of current research that offer unique advantages in certain aspects over conventional devices. Core topics are as follows: ideal properties of electron gas; electronic states in bulk GaAs and at the heterojunctions; doping properties in heterostructures; electron transport properties at 2D interfaces (including resonant tunneling); electronic and optical properties at 2D interfaces; device applications (HEMT, HBT, QWLaser, QDLaser). Possible additional topics include low-dimensional and nanometer-scale device physics, magnetic & ferroelectric devices, single-electron transistors, quantum devices, and RTD's.

ENEE 704 Physics and Simulation of Semiconductor Devices (3 credits)
Recommended: ENEE601 and ENEE600; and exposure to quantum mechanics. Credit only granted for: ENEE694 and ENEE704. Formerly: ENEE694.
The physics of electron transport in semiconductor devices will be covered. Numerical methods for attaining solutions to transport equations will be explored. Students will also learn how to use CAD tools fro semiconductor device design. Nano-electronic devices will be introduced.

ENEE 719 Advanced Topics in Microelectronics (3 credits)
Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE718.

ENEE 720 Wireless Communication Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620 and ENEE621. Credit only granted for: ENEE720 or ENEE729W. Formerly: ENEE729W.
An advanced detection course that follows and builds on the foundations of the single-user detection theory covered in ENEE 621. The main goal is to introduce the students to the multiple-user communication theory, in particular, multi-user detection theory. Students are introduced to the multi-user performance criteria of effective energy, asymptotic multi-user efficiency and near-far resistance. The physical layer techniques of diversity reception/transmission, multiple transmit/receive antennas and beamforming will also be studied.

ENEE 723 Wireless Communication Networks (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE625 and ENEE620; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Reviews the fundamental characteristics of wireless networks by focusing on the wireless link, on the media access control, and on interference issues. It reviews the cellular architecture model with emphasis on bandwidth reuse, power control, handoffs, and mobility tracking. It then considers wireless local area networks with focus on routing/multicasting and on capacity notions. It also considers the principles of layer integration and energy efficiency and it reviews the special cases of sensor networks and satellite systems.

ENEE 725 Advanced Networking (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE625; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
This is a second-year graduate course in networking. The objective of the course is to teach the current and new protocols and techniques for modeling a network.

ENEE 729 Advanced Topics in Communication (3 credits)
Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE728.

ENEE 731 Image Understanding (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE631 and ENEE633. Credit only granted for: ENEE739J or ENEE731. Formerly: ENEE739J.
An advanced graduate level course on image understanding. Mathematical and statistical approaches to solving image understanding problems will be discussed. Topics to be covered include: optimal edge and shape detection; image understanding using Markov random field models; Monte Carlo Markov Chain techniques for image understanding; shape from shading, stereo, texture and contour; structure from motion and object recognition. Existence, uniqueness and convergence issues for many of these problems will be discussed.

ENEE 739 Advanced Topics in Signal Processing (3 credits)
Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE738.

ENEE 749 Advanced Digital Systems Design (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE640 or ENEE644. Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.
VLSI architecture and algorithms; design strategies; design methodologies; system-level design; area/delay/power trade-offs; high performance systems; multi-chip modules; low-power design; hardware/software co-design; design for testability, design for manufacturability; algorithm, architecture, and component design for adaptive computing systems; prototype system development and test, possible chip fabrication by MOSIS and subsequent chip testing.

ENEE 750 VLSI Design Automation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE640. Restriction: Permission of instructor.
Design process of VLSI circuits and systems; Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools; system partitioning, floorplanning, placement, global and detailed routing; Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), Multi-Chip Modules (MCMs), Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs), possible chip fabrication by MOSIS and subsequent chip testing.

ENEE 752 Computational Intelligence and Knowledge Engineering (3 credits)
Restriction: Permission of instructor.
Concepts, design, implementation of computational intelligence involving integration of four methodologies: intelligent database management systems, rule-based systems, neural-type systems and fuzzy systems for heuristic problem solving, diagnostics, risk analysis and decision support; decision trees, reasoning techniques, heuristics and expertise; knowledge representation and acquisition; machine learning systems for pattern and feature extraction; neural network models, fuzzy systems; neural networks as expert systems; composite and neuro-fuzzy systems; coupling databases, knowledge bases and neural networks: hardware-software issues, survey of practical designs and evaluation. Completion of a term project involving system integration of two or more methodologies for a specific domain application. Students in this course with the approval of the instructor can fabricate, as part of their term project, VLSI chips via MOSIS.

ENEE 756 Computer Networks (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE324; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department. And ENEE646.
ISO open systems reference model, protocol layers, TCP/IP, channel coding, data communication concepts, local area network (LAN) topologies and transmission media, queueing theory applied to LAN performance modeling, LAN access techniques, network interconnection, network reliability, network security, performance analysis of ring and bus topology networks, reliability of fiber optic ring networks.

ENEE 757 Security in Distributed Systems and Networks (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE647; or permission of instructor.
Threats and countermeasures in centralized and distributed systems; communication security techniques based on encryption; symmetric and asymmetric encryption; encryption modes, including stream and block encryption, and cipher block chaining; message origin and mutual authentication; third-party and inter-realm authentication, authentication of mobile users; data confidentiality and integrity protocols; formal analysis of authentication protocols and message integrity; access control in distributed systems and networks; firewall design; case studies of security mechanisms and policies.

ENEE 759 Advanced Topics in Computer Engineering (3 credits)
Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE748.

ENEE 762 Stochastic Control (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE620 and ENEE660; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
Stochastic control systems, numerical methods for the Ricatti equation, the separation principle, control of linear systems with Gaussian signals and quadratic cost, non-linear stochastic control, stochastic stability, introduction to stochastic games.

ENEE 763 Advanced Nonlinear Control Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE661; or permission of instructor.
General introduction to the geometric theory of nonlinear control systems. Theory of decoupling, disturbance rejection, feedback linearization, stability, stabilization, etc.

ENEE 765 Adaptive Control (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE660 and ENEE664; or students who have taken courses with comparable content may contact the department.
General principles of adaptive control. Self-tuning regulators and model reference adaptive systems. Theoretical issues: stability, convergence, and robustness. Practical issues: implementation, computation, auto-tuning, and other successful application. Alternatives to adaptive control.

ENEE 769 Advanced Topics in Controls (3 credits)
Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE768.
Topics selected, as announced every semester, from the field of controls and its applications.

ENEE 780 Microwave Engineering (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENEE681.
Mathematical methods for the solution of the wave equation, transmission lines and waveguides, selected topics in the theory of waveguide structures, surface guides and artificial dielectrics.

ENEE 789 Advanced Topics in Electrophysics (3 credits)
Repeatable to 99 credits if content differs. Formerly: ENEE788.
Topics selected, as announced every semester, from the field of electrophysics and its applications.

ENEE 790 Quantum Electronics I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Must have knowledge of quantum mechanics; or permission of instructor.
Spontaneous emission, interaction of radiation and matter, masers, optical resonators, the gas, solid and semi-conductor lasers, electro-optical effect, propagation in anisotropic media and light modulation.

ENEE 791 Quantum Electronics II (3 credits)
Nonlinear optical effects and devices, tunable coherent light sources: optical parametric oscillator; frequency conversion and dye laser. Ultrashort pulse generation and measurement, stimulated raman effect, and applications. Interaction of acoustic and optical waves, and holography.

ENEE 798 Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineering (3 credits)
Formerly: ENEE648.
Topics selected, as announced every semester.

ENEE 799 Master's Thesis Research (1-6 credits)

ENEE 889 Teaching Workshop (1 credits)
Restriction: Must be in ENGR: MS/PhD-Electrical Engineering (Doctoral) program; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Repeatable to 4 credits if content differs.
Provide training in education for senior PhD students who contemplate an academic career, and give them the opportunity to gain some teaching experience. Emphasis is on issues that are of special importance in electrical and computer engineering education.

ENEE 898 Pre-Candidacy Research (1-8 credits)
Restriction: Must be in ENGR: MS/PhD-Electrical Engineering (Doctoral) program; and permission of ENGR-Electrical & Computer Engineering department. Repeatable to 4 credits if content differs.
Provide training in education for senior PhD students who contemplate an academic career, and give them the opportunity to gain some teaching experience. Emphasis is on issues that are of special importance in electrical and computer engineering education.

ENEE 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-8 credits)

 

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